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Helpful Tips for Flu SeasonTop of Page

FLU PREVENTION

Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness. Serious outcomes of flu infection can result in hospitalization or death. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions are at high risk of serious flu complications. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting vaccinated each year. 

HEALTHY HABITS TO HELP PREVENT THE FLU
1. Avoid close contact: Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.
2. Stay home when you are sick: If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.
3. Cover your mouth and nose: Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick. Flu and other serious respiratory illnesses, like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), are spread by cough, sneezing, or unclean hands.
4. Clean your hands: Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth: Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.
6. Practice other good health habits: Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.
 
For more information, please visit the following websites:

When Should I Keep My Child Home?Top of Page

When to stay home

Immunization InformationTop of Page

Under the California School Immunization Law (California Health and Safety Code, Sections 120325-120375), children are required to receive certain immunizations in order to attend public and private elementary and secondary schools, child care centers, family day care homes, nursery schools, day nurseries and developmental centers.
For more information regarding immunizations at school, please visit Shots For School
 
REQUIREMENTS:

Medications At SchoolTop of Page

Medications (Reference Board Policy 5141.21) - The school health office supervises students who are required to take medication during the school day.  A written authorization from the student’s physician and parent or guardian is required before designated school staff can assist the student in taking medication, including medications prescribed by the physician and over-the-counter medications such as Tylenol, Motrin, cough drops, and ointments. 
 
Any medications that will be stored in the Health Office must be signed in by a parent/guardian and staff member.  The Health Aide/staff member will verify the medication against the physician’s orders, noting the medication’s expiration date, quantity, and form (liquid, pills, inhaler, nasal spray, eye drops, etc.)
 
All medication must be in the original container and placed under lock and key in the health office in the administration building for the safety of all students, except those medications that a physician requests the pupil be allowed to carry (e.g., inhalant for asthma, Auto-injector Epi-Pen for severe allergies).  Doctor’s orders are required to be kept on file at the school for student carrying authorized medication.  When on a field trip, the medications shall be monitored by and in possession of a teacher at all times.
 
To request medication administration at school, please print out and review the form and take it your child's doctor to complete.

Health Management at SchoolTop of Page

Asthma/Asma

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, asthma is a leading chronic illness among children and adolescents in the United States. It is also one of the leading causes of school absenteeism. On average, in a classroom of 30 children, about 3 are likely to have asthma. Low-income populations, minorities, and children living in inner cities experience more emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and deaths due to asthma than the general population. 
In order to keep your student with asthma safe while they are at school, it is vital that the health services team have current medical information and physician orders for your student.  Please print out the forms below and take them, complete them, and set up an appointment with the health services team so we can set up an appropriate asthma plan for your student.
 
SCHOOL FORMS
 
OTHER RESOURCES
 
 

Allergies & Anaphylaxis/Allergia & Anafilaxis

According the the CDC, food allergies are a growing food safety and public health concern that affect an estimated 4%–6% of children in the United States.1, 2 There is no cure for food allergies and reactions can be life threatening. Strict avoidance of the food allergen is the only way to prevent a reaction. However, since it is not always easy or possible to avoid certain foods, staff in schools should develop plans for preventing an allergic reaction and responding to a food allergy emergency, including anaphylaxis. Early and quick recognition and treatment can prevent serious health problems or death.
In order to keep your student with allergies safe while they are at school, it is vital that the health services team have current medical information and physician orders for your student.  Please print out the forms below and take them, complete them, and set up an appointment with the health services team so we can set up an appropriate allergy plan for your student.
 
SCHOOL FORMS
 
OTHER RESOURCES

Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. Only 5% of people with diabetes have this form of the disease. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The body breaks down the sugars and starches you eat into a simple sugar called glucose, which it uses for energy. Insulin is a hormone that the body needs to get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body. With the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children can learn to manage their condition and live long healthy lives.
Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time it isn’t able to keep up and can’t make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels.
In order to keep your student with diabetes safe while they are at school, it is vital that the health services team have current medical information and physician orders for your student.  Please print out the forms below and take them, complete them, and set up an appointment with the health services team so we can set up an appropriate diabetes management plan for your student.
 
SCHOOL FORMS
 
OTHER RESOURCES
¿Qué es la diabetes? - Information in Spanish

Seizures/Convulsiones

Epilepsy is a common disorder of the brain that causes recurring seizures.  Epilepsy affects people of all ages, but children and older adults are more likely to have epilepsy. Seizures are the main sign of epilepsy and most people can control this with treatment. Some seizures can look like staring spells while other seizures can cause a person to collapse, stiffen or shake, and become unaware of what’s going on around them. Many times the cause is unknown.
In order to keep your student with a seizure history safe while they are at school, it is vital that the health services team have current medical information and physician orders for your student.  Please print out the forms below and take them, complete them, and set up an appointment with the health services team so we can set up an appropriate seizure management plan for your student.
 
SCHOOL FORMS
OTHER RESOURCES

Other Health Issues

Please contact your school's Health Clerk or the District Nurse for more information regarding the following:
Gastrointestinal Tube Feedings/Management at School
Catheterization at School
Airway Management at School
Wound Management at School